AATLT: Willier Triestina Cento Cable Details

Bike Radar ran a recent story on the Willier Triestina Cento, and there’s one little detail I wanted to comment on…

A lot of manufacturers are working on building uber-road bikes that are compatible with both traditional cable-actuated drivetrains and Di2 and similar electronic drivetrains.  Willier has a design detail that really impresses me:

On the top of the down tube, there’s the little carbon fiber door, as shown in the picture.  Why is that impressive?  Well, in building the bike, that little door comes off, allowing easier access for cable/wire routing.  And if you’re going to run a ‘traditional’ drivetrain, the barrel adjusters are built right into the door.  That allows you to run a continuous housing from the down tube up to the brifters–which looks cleaner, is more resistant to the elements, probably has some marginal aerodynamic effect, and did I mention that it looks cleaner?

It’s just a clever design detail that shows Willier is thinking about how to best accommodate changing technology.  It’s a design step that is not only forward thinking for the new technology, but it also improves functionality for current drivetrains.

AATLT.  All About The Little Things.

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4 thoughts on “AATLT: Willier Triestina Cento Cable Details

  1. I wonder if anyone else thinks, as I do, that down-tube cable adjusters are just about useless. The one for the rear derailleur is redundant, since the derailleur has one already. The front derailleur cable, once properly adjusted, might need a single touch-up adjustment when a new cable is installed and subsequently stretched a bit. This can best be accomplished by removing a little slack at the derailleur cable clamp. I remove the down-tube adjusters from my frames since they are rarely if ever useful “on the fly” and add complexity and a little weight.

    There’s also the fact that the little cable adjusters on most frames are really quite hard to turn, given the force of the derailleur springs against which the adjustment is made. The ones shown on the Willier frame in your blog entry look particularly difficult to operate. They appear slippery and hard to access since only about half the circumference is available for the fingers to grip.

    Yes, it’s all about the little things. And some little things we can well do without.

    Thomas

  2. I wonder if anyone else thinks, as I do, that down-tube cable adjusters are just about useless. The one for the rear derailleur is redundant, since the derailleur has one already. The front derailleur cable, once properly adjusted, might need a single touch-up adjustment when a new cable is installed and subsequently stretched a bit. This can best be accomplished by removing a little slack at the derailleur cable clamp. I remove the down-tube adjusters from my frames since they are rarely if ever useful \”on the fly\” and add complexity and a little weight.

    There\’s also the fact that the little cable adjusters on most frames are really quite hard to turn, given the force of the derailleur springs against which the adjustment is made. The ones shown on the Willier frame in your blog entry look particularly difficult to operate. They appear slippery and hard to access since only about half the circumference is available for the fingers to grip.

    Yes, it\’s all about the little things. And some little things we can well do without.

    Thomas

    • Certainly a valid perspective. From my perspective, I appreciate a barrel adjuster, particularly on the rear derailleur, that is accessible while riding. There have been a number of occasions where, despite my anal retentive maintenance tendencies, I have wanted to do a quick in-ride trim of the rear derailleur, and this would easily permit the same.

      • Agreed! And to make it easier to adjust, shift it all the way slack (smallest cog) and turning that adjuster gets a lot easier.

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